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Issuers2020-10-26T13:03:43+00:00
How to raise funds on Ignite Social Impact2020-06-29T17:20:22+00:00

Just submit your project and detailed contact information here, and we will get back to you after reviewing your project and due diligence documents. If approved, you will be invited by our team to create an issuer account in the “Invest” section of the website, to upload your project description and mandatory documents such as your business plan, deck, video pitch and due diligence documents. Your offering will be featured in the “Invest” section of the website and you will be invited to mobilize your network as much as possible to come and support your company alongside our investors community.

How we screen issuers2020-08-03T15:21:54+00:00

Under regulations issued by the SEC, we are required to:

  • Have a “reasonable basis” for believing that every Issuer on our Platform is eligible to offer its Securities on our Platform, and is complying with Title III. We might perform our own due diligence, but we are generally allowed to rely on the representations of the Issuer.
  • Have a “reasonable basis” for believing that every Issuer on our Platform has established means to accurate records of the holders (owners) of its Securities. Again, we might perform our own due diligence, but we are generally allowed to rely on the representations of the Issuer.
  • Deny access to the Platform to any Issuer if:

    *We have a “reasonable basis” for believing that an Issuer or any of its officers, directors, or beneficial owner of 20% or more of its outstanding voting securities is subject to disqualification under the rules discussed under “Disqualification of Issuers” below. We are not allowed to rely solely on the Issuer’s representations to form this “reasonable belief,” but must conduct background checks with third parties.
    *We have a “reasonable basis” for believing that the Issuer or the offering presents the potential for fraud or otherwise raises concerns about investor protection, or we can’t effectively assess the risk.

 

We will comply with all those requirements. But – and this is very important – we are not required to conclude that Issuers on our Platform represent good investments for investors. In fact, we are not even allowed to tell you if we think that one Issuer is a better investment than another Issuer. You have to make those decisions on your own.

Disqualification of Issuers2020-08-03T15:22:05+00:00

Title III may not be used if the Issuer or certain other people have been the subject of certain disqualifying events during the last 10 years.

The “certain other people” are:

  • Any predecessor of the Issuer;
  • Any director, officer, general partner, or manager of the Issuer;
  • A person owning 20% or more of the Issuer’s voting power;
  • Any promoter associated with the Issuer;
  • Any person who will be paid for soliciting investors; and
  • Any general partner, director, officer, or manager of such a solicitor.

The “certain disqualifying events” include a long list of events, all involving improper actions in the securities business – for example, the conviction of a felony or misdemeanor in connection with the purchase or sale of any security, or the loss of license of a securities broker for misconduct. As explained above, we will conduct background checks before allowing an Issuer to list on our Platform.

Information to disclose2020-05-11T07:28:26+00:00

Any issuer must provide extensive information on a Form C, which will be available on the Site. The information includes:

  • The Issuer’s name, address, and website
  • The Issuer’s directors and officers
  • The principal occupation and employment for the last three years of each director and officer
  • The names of each person owning 20% or more of the Issuer’s voting securities
  • The risk factors associated with the investment
  • The Issuer’s business and business plan
  • How the proceeds of the offering will be used
  • The Issuer’s ownership and capital structure
  • A description of how rights exercised by the principals of the Issuer could affect investors
  • The compensation paid to us in the offering
  • A description of previous offerings by the Issuer
  • Whether the Issuer has previously failed to file the reports required by law
  • Transactions with officers, directors, and other “insiders”
  • Whether the Issuer would be disqualified from offering securities under Title III under the “bad actor” rules, if the effective date of those rules were different
  • A discussion of the Issuer’s financial condition
  • How the Issuer will deal with over-subscriptions
  • Where on the Issuers website it will post annual reports, and when the annual reports will be available
  • Financial information about the Issuer, as described below
  • Any other information necessary in order to make the statements made, in light of the circumstances in which they were made, not misleading

What types of financial information an Issuer must provide depends on three things:

  • How much money the Issuer is trying to raise in the current offering;
  • Whether this is the Issuer’s first offering using Title III; and
  • If this is not the Issuer’s first offering using Title III, how much the Issuer has raised in other Title III offerings during the last 12 months.
Where the amount of the Title III offering, together with all other Title III offerings of the same Issuer within the last 12 months, is: The Issuer must provide:
$107,000 or less The Issuer’s total income, tax income, and total tax, as reported on the Issuer’s Federal tax return, certified by the principal executive officer of the Issuer; and financial statements of the Issuer, certified by the principal executive officer of the Issuer. If financial statements are available that have been reviewed or audited by a public accountant that is independent of the Issuer, then those financial statement will be used instead.
More than $107,000, but less than $535,000 Financial statements that have been reviewed by a public accountant that is independent of the Issuer, but If financial statements are available that have been audited by a public accountant that is independent of the Issuer, then those financial statement will be used instead.
More than $535,000 If this is the Issuer’s first Title III offering, financial statements that have been reviewed by a public accountant that is independent of the Issuer. If this is not the Issuer’s first Title III offering, financial statements that have been audited by a public accountant that is independent of the Issuer.

All financial statements must be prepared in accordance with U.S. “generally accepted accounting principles.”  Financial statement reviews must be conducted in accordance with the Statements on Standards for Accounting and Review Services issued by the Accounting and Review Services Committee of the AICPA.  Financial statement audits must be conducted in accordance with either (i) auditing standards of the AICPA, or (ii) the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board.

If information changes before closing2020-05-11T07:29:08+00:00

If there are important changes between the date of publication of the offering and the date the investment is concluded, then (1) the Issuer must notify investors of the changes, (2) investment commitments will be canceled automatically unless investors reconfirm their commitment within five business days of receipt of the notice.

After a successful closing2020-05-11T07:29:28+00:00

After a closing, the Issuer is generally required to file annual reports with the SEC and post them on its own website within 120 days after the end of the fiscal year.  The annual report will typically include:

  • The same types of information included on the Form C you provided;
  • Updated financial statements certified by the principal executive officer of the Issuer (the financial statements don’t have to be reviewed or audited, but if the Issuer already has reviewed or audited financial statements, they must be provided); and
  • Updated disclosures about the Issuer’s financial condition.

 

The Issuer is allowed to stop filing annual reports upon the earlier to occur of:

  • The date the Issuer has filed at least one annual report and has fewer than 300 shareholders of record;
  • The date the Issuer has filed at least three annual reports and has total assets no greater than $10 million;
  • The date the Issuer or someone else buys all of the securities issued in the Title III offering;
  • The date the Issuer registers its securities and is required to file reports under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934; or
  • The date the Issuer is dissolved under state law.